A male Rhinoceros Hornbill carrying a mouse to his nest.(Photograph by Tim Laman)Asian hornbills have a unique nesting behavior, so far found in no other type of bird:”When a female hornbill is ready to lay eggs, she enters a hole in a tree and seals the entrance—using a combination of feces, regurgitated fruit, and mud delivered by her mate—leaving just a narrow opening. Once sealed inside, the female becomes totally dependent on the male, who passes food to her through the hole. For up to four months, the bird remains walled off from the world as she incubates her eggs and raises the chicks. A risky nesting strategy—the family is doomed if anything happens to the male—it provides hornbills nearly 100-percent protection against predators for their eggs and hatchlings.” (Excerpt from Hooked On Hornbills) 

A male Rhinoceros Hornbill carrying a mouse to his nest.
(Photograph by Tim Laman)

Asian hornbills have a unique nesting behavior, so far found in no other type of bird:

When a female hornbill is ready to lay eggs, she enters a hole in a tree and seals the entrance—using a combination of feces, regurgitated fruit, and mud delivered by her mate—leaving just a narrow opening. Once sealed inside, the female becomes totally dependent on the male, who passes food to her through the hole. For up to four months, the bird remains walled off from the world as she incubates her eggs and raises the chicks. A risky nesting strategy—the family is doomed if anything happens to the male—it provides hornbills nearly 100-percent protection against predators for their eggs and hatchlings.” (Excerpt from Hooked On Hornbills

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